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1.

TEXT I. SUMMARISING

2.

TEXT II. STRUCTURE OF PARAGRAPH

3.

TEXT III. NOTES ON PRINTING IN RUSSIA

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TEXT IV.

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TEXT V.

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TEXT VI. LARGE-FORMAT RAPIDA A BIG HIT

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TEXT VII. ECO-LABELLING

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TEXT VIII. THE WORLD'S FASTEST NEWSPAPER

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TEXT IX.

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TEXT X.

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TEXT XI.

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TEXT XII. ECOLOGY TECHNOLOGY

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TEXT XIII. THROUGH ELECTROSTATIC TO THE SUBLIME

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TEXT XIV.

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TEXT XV. AN EXCITING FUTURE BECKONS THE PRINTER

16.

I. Read the text and think of its title.

The Moscow State University of Printing Arts, established in 1930, is the largest institution of its kind in Russia, with nearly 6,000 students on its roll. With 35 departments and more than 400 professors, readers and lecturers, the University could well be the biggest printing institute in the world.

The University is strong in the academic sphere and considerable stress is given to theoretical grounding, especially in the degree and post -graduate courses.

The University has large laboratories and machine and binding shops for practical training of the students. Computers have been introduced and their use is increasing. For generating much-needed funds the Rector has embarked on several innovative schemes with the dual objective of improving the financial status of the University as well as developing training facilities in the Institute.

Rank Xerox has set up a large training centre for their customers in the premises for which they pay rent to the University and also extend training facilities to the students. A separate section, called Pronto Print, with a high-speed newspaper rotary press has been installed almost exclusively for printing a commercial daily newspaper. The University also runs a commercial publishing house called The World of Books.

Close cooperation exists between the University and key research institutions. The University entered into an agreement of a fruitful cooperation with Bergische University, Wuppertal, Germany.

The Rector told me that he looked forward to cooperation between Russia and India in all fields covering the printing industry.

The printing and publishing industry in the Russian Federation is currently in a state of flux. The majority of medium and large presses are government-owned. Privatisation is under active way. The government tries to hold more than 51 per cent shares in about 50 printing and publishing establishments and another group of graphic firms will be totally privatised. The government is exercising general supervision to ensure that such firms continue as printing establishments and do not sell their property.

Since German unification, a major source for the supply of machinery has dried up. Most of the plants have been taken over by major German companies, resulting in substantial increase in prices. Like India, Russia is a very good market for medium and low cost printing machinery, PS plates, inks, etc, which are mostly imported from abroad. Indian printers and manufacturers set up new ventures in various fields, including production of low-cost textbooks and general books for export to emerging markets, particularly in Africa.

II. Answer the following questions:

  1. What can you say about the Moscow State University of Printing?

  2. What do the University authorities do to raise much-needed funds?

  3. What does the visitor mean when he says that the Russian Federation is currently in a state of flux?

  4. What products for printing houses are imported to Russia and India?

III. Write the plan of the article.

IV. Summarise the article.