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What are proverbs?

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Cambridge

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Bank holidays in Britan

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Edinburg

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Glimpses of the history of America

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Tower of London

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Smoking

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Media ownership and freedom of expression

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The battle for readers

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Radio and television broadcasting

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National newspapers

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Television and satellite broadcasting

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Radio

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News vs. news people

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Pocahontas

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The causes of crime

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The lost colony

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Old Hickory

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The war of 1812

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A long time ago

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George Washington and the Whiskey Rebellion

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The capital of Scotland is built on the southern shore of the estuary of the river Forth, where a steep basalt ridge breaks the level of the coastal plain. The site was originally chosen with an eye to defense rather than convenience, for the first building erected, and on -the highest point, was the castle. This was the centre of Scottish government until the Union of the Crowns in 1603.

The deep valley surrounding the Castle Rock was marshy. The result was that the old town of Edinburgh could grow only along the narrow ridge-top in the form of a single street of tall steep-roofed medieval houses, often twelve stories high. This street is the famous Royal Mile, which has so many associations with Scottish history.

By the middle of the 18th century Scotland had emerged from the long period of internal strife, and with prosperity came a desire to expand the city of Edinburgh. In 1772 bridges were completed across the marshy valleys to the north and south of the Royal Mile, connecting the town with new building land. The new town grew quickly in broad streets and squares whose classic orderliness is in complete contrast to the castle and rugged walls of the old town.

Although Edinburgh has been eclipsed as an industrial city by Glasgo, it still has a number of varied industries. The most important are brewing, paper-making, book-printing and the manufacture of rubber. A small but vital industry is map-making.

The port of Edinburgh is Leith from where trade is carried on with Baltic and European ports.