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What are proverbs?

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Cambridge

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Bank holidays in Britan

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Edinburg

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Glimpses of the history of America

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Tower of London

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Smoking

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Media ownership and freedom of expression

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The battle for readers

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Radio and television broadcasting

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National newspapers

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Television and satellite broadcasting

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Radio

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News vs. news people

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Pocahontas

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The causes of crime

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The lost colony

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Old Hickory

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The war of 1812

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A long time ago

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George Washington and the Whiskey Rebellion

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At the time Ottar made his journey into the Arctic Sea. Norway was ruled by a very stern king who resolved to unite the country under his own rule. No man was permitted to own land in his own right but only by permission of the king. A large part of farmers who had never lived under feudal tenure, sailed to Iceland. Among them was a young man named Eric Thorwaldson, also called Eric the Red. There he had a quarrel with a big farmer and, being a landless stranger, was declared an outlaw for three years. He and his wife and small son sailed away toward the setting sun, in search of new lands.

Three years went by. One day in the fall of 985 a sail appeared over the western horizon. The sails of his small vessel were black with hard usage, but he and his wife and son, and a baby boy, seemed to be in the best of health.

Where had they been? Eric told his story. He had come to a land rising high above the sea. It was covered with ice even in the middle of summer, but on the south-west side of the big island he found land with rich meadows and fine woods, which he named Greenland.

Here was a tale of discovery, the like of which no man had ever heard. People came from afar to look at the traveller and to ask questions: How large was the country? Was it inhabited by other people? Was there room for others to settle there? Eric answered that it was bigger than Iceland with room for thousands of people. There were no inhabitants, and he would be glad to share his possessions with those who wanted to join him.

Thus, many islanders decided to sail away to the newly discovered land with Eric. Thirty-five vessels took part in this first emigration to the new world. On the way, however, they were overtaken by a furious storm. Only fourteen ships reached the coast of Greenlan