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What are proverbs?

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Cambridge

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Bank holidays in Britan

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Edinburg

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Glimpses of the history of America

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Tower of London

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Smoking

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Media ownership and freedom of expression

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The battle for readers

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Radio and television broadcasting

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National newspapers

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Television and satellite broadcasting

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Radio

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News vs. news people

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Pocahontas

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The causes of crime

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The lost colony

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Old Hickory

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The war of 1812

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A long time ago

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George Washington and the Whiskey Rebellion

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Nine centuries have passed since its erection, but time failed to destroy the enormous thickness of its walls or shake the solidity of its construction. In spite of constant alterations and repairs during the ages of its existence the tower has retained much of its former character and original appearance. Flowing past the gloomy structure the dark waters of the Thames reflect its enormous walls and square towers as they had reflected them in the eleventh century.

Looking at the Tower you feel its close connection to the historical past of England with its constant and cruel fighting for power. Since the time of its erection the Tower of London has served many purposes: first a king's palace, then a fortress and a political prison. Now it is a museum.

Several kings of England found protection within its walls both against foreign enemies and their own people fighting for their liberties and privileges. The White Tower was the royal residence, all the kings of England spending the first days of their reign there according to the ancient tradition. From the White Tower kings went to their coronation and some of them came down to the scaffold lying in the outer court, forced to surrender their power to new pretenders.

Among the numerous prisoners were kings of England, Scotland and France, princes and noblemen, protestants and catholics, scientists and public leaders. Shakespeare mentioned many of their names describing their tragic fate in his historical plays.