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What are proverbs?

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Cambridge

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Bank holidays in Britan

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Edinburg

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Glimpses of the history of America

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Tower of London

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Smoking

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Media ownership and freedom of expression

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The battle for readers

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Radio and television broadcasting

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National newspapers

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Television and satellite broadcasting

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Radio

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News vs. news people

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Pocahontas

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The causes of crime

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The lost colony

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Old Hickory

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The war of 1812

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A long time ago

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George Washington and the Whiskey Rebellion

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The British mass media today incorporate the press (newspapers), periodicals, magazines, radio and television. These features have evolved from simple methods of production, distribution and communication to the present sophisticated and technological complexities. The mass media now expanded into homes and places of business, so that their influence is very powerful and an inevitable part of daily life. Today it is estimated that some 61 per cent of British people obtain their news and views of current affairs from television, 20 per cent from newspapers and 15 per cent from radio. A wide circulation of print media (newspapers and magazines) was hindered in the past by problems of transportation, distribution and literacy. But an expanded educational system, new inventions and Britain's small geographical size have, over the last hundred years, reduced these difficulties. The growth of mass literacy after 1870 provided the owners of print media with a greatly increased market. This led to the popularization of newspapers and magazines, which had previously been limited to the middle and upper classes.

The print media were progressively used not only for news, information and communication, but also for entertainment and, inevitably,the increased earning of profits by the owners. Ownership and the new varieties of print media expanded rapidly in the newly competitive atmosphere of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and were helped by financially rewarding advertising. The owners also realized that political and social influence could be achieved through control of the means of communication.