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What are proverbs?

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Cambridge

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Bank holidays in Britan

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Edinburg

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Glimpses of the history of America

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Tower of London

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Smoking

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Media ownership and freedom of expression

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The battle for readers

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Radio and television broadcasting

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National newspapers

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Television and satellite broadcasting

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Radio

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News vs. news people

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Pocahontas

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The causes of crime

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The lost colony

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Old Hickory

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The war of 1812

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A long time ago

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George Washington and the Whiskey Rebellion

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The financial and ownership structures of the British media industry are complex, and involve a range of media outlets which include the press, radio and television. Sometimes an individual company will own a number of print products, such as newspapers and magazines, and will specialise in this area. But this kind of ownership is declining. Today it is more common for newspapers to be owned and controlled by corporations which are concerned with wide media interests, such as films, radio, television, magazines, and satellite and cable companies. Other newspaper - and media-owning groups have diversified their interests even further, and may be involved in a variety of non-media activities. In Britain, only a few newspapers like The Guardian and The Independent have avoided being controlled by multinational commercial concerns.

The involvement of large enterprises into media business, and the resulting concentration of ownership in a few hands, has caused some concern in Britain. Although these concentrations do not amount to a monopoly situation, there have been frequent enquiries into the questions of ownership and control. Some critics have argued that the state should provide public funds or subsidies to the media industries in order to prevent them being taken over by big business groups. But this suggestion has not been adopted, and it is generally felt that there are potential dangers in allowing the state to gain any direct or indirect financial influence over the media.