..



..
1.

2.

2.1.

2.2.

3.

4.

Text 1

5.

Text 2
What are proverbs?

6.

Text 3

7.

Text 4
Cambridge

8.

Text 5
Bank holidays in Britan

9.

Text 6

10.

Text 7

11.

Text 8

12.

Text 9

13.

Text 10

14.

Text 11

15.

Text 12
Edinburg

16.

Text 13
Glimpses of the history of America

17.

Text 14
Tower of London

18.

Text 15
Smoking

19.

Text 16

20.

Text 17

21.

Text 18

22.

Text 19
Media ownership and freedom of expression

23.

Text 20

24.

Text 21

25.

Text 22
The battle for readers

26.

Text 23
Radio and television broadcasting

27.

Text 24
National newspapers

28.

Text 25
Television and satellite broadcasting

29.

Text 26
Radio

30.

Text 27

31.

Text 28

32.

Text 29

33.

Text 30

34.

Text 31
News vs. news people

35.

Text 32

36.

Text 33

37.

Text 34

38.

Text 35

39.

Text 36
Pocahontas

40.

Text 37

41.

Text 38

42.

Text 39
The causes of crime

43.

Text 40

44.

Text 41

45.

Text 42
The lost colony

46.

Text 43
Old Hickory

47.

Text 44
The war of 1812

48.

Text 45
A long time ago

49.

Text 46
George Washington and the Whiskey Rebellion

50.

The competition between the BBC and independent television is strong, and the battle of the ratings indicates the popularity or

(otherwise) of individual programmes. But this competition can mean that similar programmes are shown at the same time on the major channels, in order to appeal to specific markets and to attract the biggest shares of the audience. It is also argued that competition has reduced the quality of programmes overall, and has resulted in an appeal to the lowest common denominator in taste. There are fears that standards will decrease further if the BBC is forced to lessen its commitment to public-service broadcasting.

Voices have occasionally been raised about the alleged level of violence on British television. Some private individuals have attempted by their protests to reform and influence the kind of programmes that are shown. There is, however, little conclusive research evidence that the public are being morally harmed by watching television for an average viewing time of twenty seven hours per week. But the Conservative government considers that violance, sex and obscenity on television do affect viewers, some more than others.

Television and other associated technological developments have become very attractive in Britain, and a rich source of entertainment profits. At one stage it was considered that cable television would considerably expand these possibilities. But cable in Britain, although growing slowly, has been challenged first by video equipment sales and secondly, by satellite programmes.