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What are proverbs?

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Cambridge

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Bank holidays in Britan

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Edinburg

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Glimpses of the history of America

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Tower of London

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Smoking

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Media ownership and freedom of expression

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The battle for readers

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Radio and television broadcasting

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National newspapers

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Television and satellite broadcasting

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Radio

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News vs. news people

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Pocahontas

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The causes of crime

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The lost colony

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Old Hickory

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The war of 1812

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A long time ago

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George Washington and the Whiskey Rebellion

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The first experimental radio transmissions in Britain were made at the end of the nineteenth century, and the systems were further developed in the early twentieth century. After a period of limited public availability of radio services, national radio broadcasting was established in 1922 when the British Broadcasting Company was formed under the direction of John Reith. In 1927 Reith became the first director-general of the new British Broadcasting Corporation (the present BBC) and was to set the form and style for the BBC's future development. Since the BBC had the monopoly in broadcasting, it tended to have a paternalistic image, which still exists today to some extent. Reith was concerned that the BBC should be independent of the government and commercial interests; that it should strive for quality (as he defined it); and that it should be a public broadcasting service, with a duty to inform, educate and entertain. Since these early days, the BBC has built up a considerable reputation for impartial news reporting and quality programmes, both in its domestic services and through its worldwide radio broadcasting on the external services. The BBC continued its monopoly on broadcasting into the 1950s, in both radio and television (which had started in 1936 for a very limited audience). But there was an increasing pressure from commercial and political interests to widen the scope of broadcasting. The result of that pressure was that commercial (or independent) broadcasting was created in 1954 with the passing of an act to establish an independent television authority.