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What are proverbs?

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Cambridge

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Bank holidays in Britan

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Edinburg

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Glimpses of the history of America

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Tower of London

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Smoking

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Media ownership and freedom of expression

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The battle for readers

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Radio and television broadcasting

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National newspapers

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Television and satellite broadcasting

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Radio

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News vs. news people

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Pocahontas

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The causes of crime

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The lost colony

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Old Hickory

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The war of 1812

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A long time ago

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George Washington and the Whiskey Rebellion

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National newspapers in Britain today are those which are available in all parts of the country on the same day, including Sundays. Many of them are delivered direct to the home from local newsagents by newsboys and girls. The good internal communications systems of a relatively small country have over the years enabled a genuine national press to develop, in contrast to the situation in some other larger nations where size and geography are often great obstacles.

The first British newspapers to have some claim to national circulation appeared in the early eighteenth century, and were followed by others, such as The Times (1785), The Observer (1791) and The Sunday Times (1822). But most of them were quality papers, which catered for a relatively small, educated and largely London - based market.

In the nineteenth century, the growth and composition of population conditioned the types of newspapers which were produced. The first popular national papers were initially and deliberately printed on Sundays, such as News of The World (1843) and The People (1881). They were cheap and easy reading, and were aimed at the expanding and increasingly literate working class. In 1896, Alfred Harmsworth produced The Daily Mail, which was targeted to the lower middle class and served as a more accessible alternative to the quality dailies. Harmsworth then published The Daily Mirror in 1903 which was aimed at the working-class, popular market. Both The Mail and The Mirror were soon selling more than a million copies a day.