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What are proverbs?

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Cambridge

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Bank holidays in Britan

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Edinburg

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Glimpses of the history of America

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Tower of London

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Smoking

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Media ownership and freedom of expression

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The battle for readers

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Radio and television broadcasting

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National newspapers

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Television and satellite broadcasting

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Radio

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News vs. news people

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Pocahontas

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The causes of crime

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The lost colony

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Old Hickory

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The war of 1812

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A long time ago

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George Washington and the Whiskey Rebellion

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By law, no broadcaster can own more than seven television stations, and 10 radio stations, with no more than one radio-TV combination in a single market. This law is based on the theory that decentralized or local ownership is more in the national interest than concentration of media properties by one owner. No network is permitted more than one affiliated station in a single market.

During a typical day, an affiliated station devotes about 70 percent of its air time to programming supplied by the network and obtains about 30 percent from other sources. Apart from local news, sports and weather programs, television stations generally produce few of their own programs. But stations buy movies and syndicated entertainment programs from firms independent of networks and sell time within these programs to advertisers, which provides their other main source of revenue, apart from their percentage of the network's commercials.

As of 1981, there were 1.03 television stations operating in the United States, including 269 public noncommercial stations, which are operated by community groups or educational institutions. (Public broadcasting stations are operated by funds from government and private foundations and by donations from viewers: their audiences are generally smaller than those of commercial television stations.) In the average American household the television set is on for more than five hours a day (although people arc not necessarily watching it all that time). Children aged 2 to 11 watch about 28 hours of television a week, more time than they spend in school classrooms.