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What are proverbs?

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Cambridge

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Bank holidays in Britan

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Edinburg

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Glimpses of the history of America

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Tower of London

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Smoking

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Media ownership and freedom of expression

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The battle for readers

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Radio and television broadcasting

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National newspapers

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Television and satellite broadcasting

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Radio

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News vs. news people

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Pocahontas

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The causes of crime

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The lost colony

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Old Hickory

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The war of 1812

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A long time ago

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George Washington and the Whiskey Rebellion

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A profound distrust of Western liberalism permeates political thought in much of the Third World. Freedom of exchange - whether of goods or of information - is becoming a suspect idea. As developing countries seek to establish their national identities through self-reliance, they are increasingly focusing on the role of the international media, which promote what they see as alien values. Western assertions that pluralism is universally applicable and that free expression is a human right are being dismissed as at best irrelevant and at worst a form of cultural imperialism.

Thus, the doctrine of the free flow of information is coming under sustained attack from the Third World. Its leaders allege that the concept has simply enabled the handful of Western news agencies and networks that collect the overwhelming bulk of the world's news to impose Western attitudes and market economies on developing societies. They argue that the imported model of a free press only sows dissent and conflict in their countries, instead

of promoting the unity vital to economic development and to the building of an independent, modern state.

The attack on the international news media consists of three main charges. First, the media are too powerful; they penetrate too widely and too thoroughly. Second, their services are not truly international: news is selected to suit Western attitudes and interests and is heavily biased toward coverage of the industrialized countries, leaving Third World newsrooms flooded with irrelevant information. Last, they lack the virtues of accuracy and objectivity on which they base their claims to international respect.