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What are proverbs?

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Cambridge

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Bank holidays in Britan

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Edinburg

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Glimpses of the history of America

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Tower of London

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Smoking

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Media ownership and freedom of expression

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The battle for readers

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Radio and television broadcasting

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National newspapers

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Television and satellite broadcasting

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Radio

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News vs. news people

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Pocahontas

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The causes of crime

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The lost colony

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Old Hickory

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The war of 1812

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A long time ago

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George Washington and the Whiskey Rebellion

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An increasing number of journalism schools offer courses in ethics of the profession. Special seminars on the role of the press in American society are held with increasing frequency under the sponsorship of universities and foundations. One private scholarly organization sponsored research by a veteran journalist on American news coverage of a phase of the Vietnam war. The result of this effort was publication of a major book and its conclusions, in turn, became the subject of lively debate within the profession. It is now common for industrial associations, at their annual meetings, to hold panel discussions about news coverage of their particular fields. These sessions bring together journalists and business leaders for candid - and sometimes heated - exchanges of views.

James Boylan, who served as the first editor of Columbia Journalism Review, left, then eventually returned for a second tour of duty in that post, compared the changed atmosphere: There is a much healthier attitude. We still find quite a few people in the field who feel that their work is above criticism, but the number is going down. It is no longer shocking when the press takes a hard look at its performance.

Norman Isaacs of the National News Council thinks that journalism is still the most defensive of professions despite the escalation of serious criticism. Yet he points out that self-evaluation is in a boom period. We are seeing an explosion of discussion on the subject and the more discussion that takes place the more accountable the press will become. If the trend continues the News Council will become unnecessary.