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What are proverbs?

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Cambridge

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Bank holidays in Britan

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Edinburg

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Glimpses of the history of America

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Tower of London

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Smoking

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Media ownership and freedom of expression

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The battle for readers

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Radio and television broadcasting

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National newspapers

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Television and satellite broadcasting

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Radio

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News vs. news people

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Pocahontas

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The causes of crime

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The lost colony

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Old Hickory

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The war of 1812

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A long time ago

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George Washington and the Whiskey Rebellion

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Television reporters and anchorpersons have become celebrities: sometimes this handicaps them in covering a news event. NBC's long-time anchorman David Brinkley complained that he was uncomfortable covering political events because the audiences would pay more attention to him than to the candidates. Print reporters can remain largely unnoticed as they cover events but millions of viewers recognize television correspondents immediately.

Networks often publicize newscasters in the same manner as stars and personalities. When Barbara Walters in 1977 was hired by ABC-TV as anchorwoman and interviewer at an unprecedented $1 - million annual salary, her face appeared on the cover of several influential magazines.

Similarly, The Washington Post reporters who investigated the Watergate break-in, Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, became media celebrities. Their book about the investigation, All the President's Men, was made into a movie, with Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman portraying the reporters. Woodward and Bernstein themselves participated in a network TV program devoted principally to Hollywood movie stars.

Some people are concerned that this emphasis on personalities is at the expense of issues of public importance. However, it could be argued that at no time in the nation's history did more than a very small percentage of the population concern itself with issues beyond personal needs. It is indeed possible that the electronic information which today pervades the lives of Americans has brought people closer to the issues.