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What are proverbs?

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Cambridge

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Bank holidays in Britan

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Edinburg

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Glimpses of the history of America

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Tower of London

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Smoking

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Media ownership and freedom of expression

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The battle for readers

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Radio and television broadcasting

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National newspapers

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Television and satellite broadcasting

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Radio

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News vs. news people

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Pocahontas

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The causes of crime

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The lost colony

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Old Hickory

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The war of 1812

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A long time ago

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George Washington and the Whiskey Rebellion

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Research into happiness is always open to question. Do people, when asked, tell the truth about whether or not they are happy? Isn't it peculiar to tell a complete stranger that you are miserable? Possibly. Nevertheless, people who fill in questionnaires without giving their names show the same sort of results as those in open interview. It might also be suggested that people do not know whether they are happy or not. But, if you believe that most people are aware of their own emotional state and express it honestly when asked, the research makes some fascinating discoveries.

It is interesting to note what does not necessarily make you happy. Class, wealth, social position, intelligence and race are all poor indicators (although poverty is a good indicator of unhappiness). Women are slightly happier than men, and older people rather more satisfied though less joyful - than younger people. But most people are -or claim to be - happy. This is, surprisingly, the same for everyone. Whatever situation people are in, whether they are prisoners or lottery winners, roughly the same levels of happiness on average can be found. Most people score six or seven on a scale of one to ten. Marriage is a greater source of happiness than being single. 35 per cent of married men and 41.5 per cent of married women claim to be very happy, where as the figures for single men and women are 18.5 percent and 25.5 per cent. However, having children is source of happiness many believe it to be. Survey after survey shows that happiness levels begin to fall after the birth of a child, reaching their lowest point in the teenage years and only returning to previous levels when the children leave home. This is rather strange, since people keep on having kids despite one clear evidence that having children makes you less happy. One possible explanation is that there are things that people consider more valuable than happiness, like a feeling of being worthwhile. Or maybe bad marriages stick together because of children.