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What are proverbs?

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Cambridge

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Bank holidays in Britan

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Edinburg

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Glimpses of the history of America

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Tower of London

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Smoking

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Media ownership and freedom of expression

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The battle for readers

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Radio and television broadcasting

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National newspapers

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Television and satellite broadcasting

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Radio

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News vs. news people

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Pocahontas

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The causes of crime

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The lost colony

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Old Hickory

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The war of 1812

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A long time ago

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George Washington and the Whiskey Rebellion

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An American Indian princess, Pocahontas, b. 1595, d. Mar. 21, 1617, supposedly saved the Life of Captain John Smith and befriended the English colony at Jamestown. A daughter of the chief of the Powhatan tribe of Virginia, she was said to have been beautiful and intelligent.

In 1608 Smith, who had helped establish the .English settlement at Jamestown, was captured by the Indians and brought to Pocahontas's village, about 24 km from Jamestown. According to Smith's account in his General History of Virginia, he was set before an altar stone to be killed but was spared when Pocahontas threw herself over his body. Many historians have been skeptical about Smith's story, however. Pocahontas then became the intermediary between the Englishman and her father and reportedly persuaded the Indians to bring food to the starving colonists.

In 1613, Pocahontas was seized by Captain Samuel Argall and taken to Jamestown. From the Reverend Alexander Whitaker she learned the elements of Christianity and became a convert. Pocahontas also learned the ways of the English, and in 1614, with her father's approval, she married John Rolfe, a successful tobacco planter. The marriage initiated an eight-year period of peaceful relations between Indians and settlers. A boy, christened Thomas, was born to the couple in 1615. The following year Pocahontas (now Lady Rebecca Rolfe), her family, and an Indian retinue voyaged to England. Pocahontas charmed London society and was entertained at the royal palace at Whitehall. While preparing to return to America, she was overcome by illness and died.