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What are proverbs?

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Cambridge

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Bank holidays in Britan

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Edinburg

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Glimpses of the history of America

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Tower of London

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Smoking

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Media ownership and freedom of expression

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The battle for readers

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Radio and television broadcasting

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National newspapers

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Television and satellite broadcasting

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Radio

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News vs. news people

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Pocahontas

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The causes of crime

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The lost colony

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Old Hickory

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The war of 1812

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A long time ago

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George Washington and the Whiskey Rebellion

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The Senate has long operated under the principle of unlimited debate, that is, all members may speak for as long as they wish on the matter under the consideration. To expedite matters, the leadership may request unanimous consent to establish a time limit on debate for a specific legislative measure. Extended debate designed to defeat or amend a bill by dilatory tactics is called a filibuster. Those senators opposed to a filibuster may file a cloture motion, signed by at least sixteen senators, under which a vote of sixty senators can limit the remaining debate.

When a bill is being debated, the floor managers of the two parties will often take the front row, center aisle seats of the Majority and Minority Leaders. If a time limit has been established, they will allot portions of their times to senators wishing to speak for or against the bill. It is not unusual to find only a few members in the chamber at any given time during the debate, with other senators attending committee hearings or at work in their offices. Members' offices are equipped with hot lines and televisions that provide instant access to what is happening on the Senate floor. When the bells signal a vote, all members present enter the chamber and record their ayes and nays.

Whenever the Senate is in session, the American flag flies above the chamber's roof. When the legislative load is especially heavy, or when a filibuster is under way, the Senate may hold sessions long into the night or around the clock. A lantern at the top of the Capitol dome is always lit during these night sessions. Whether at two in the morning or two in the afternoon, the public is always welcome to the galleries to witness the proceedings.