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What are proverbs?

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Cambridge

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Bank holidays in Britan

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Edinburg

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Glimpses of the history of America

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Tower of London

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Smoking

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Media ownership and freedom of expression

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The battle for readers

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Radio and television broadcasting

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National newspapers

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Television and satellite broadcasting

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Radio

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News vs. news people

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Pocahontas

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The causes of crime

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The lost colony

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Old Hickory

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The war of 1812

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A long time ago

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George Washington and the Whiskey Rebellion

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In 1788 George Washington was elected as the first President of the United State. New York was then the country's capital city. On April 30, 1789, Washington stood on a balcony there and swore a solemn oath to preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States. When the ceremony came to an end he officially took control of the nation's government.

Washington believed that political parties were harmful. He said later that it was the interest and duty of a wise people to discourage them. Even so, he favored a strong federal government, so he tended to govern in a Federalist manner. The way that he dealt with the Whiskey Rebellion of 1794 was an example of this.

The main crop grown by farmers in western Pennsylvania was corn. Some of this they made into whiskey, which they then sold. When the federal government placed a tax on the whiskey the Pennsylvania farmers refused to pay it. They burned down the houses of the federal tax collectors, or revenue agents, who tried to make them pay.

Washington sent an army of 15, 000 men to support the rights of the federal government. Faced by soldiers, the rebels went home quietly. The Whiskey Rebellion collapsed without any fighting. The soldiers arrested a few of the leaders, but later the President pardoned them.

After this there was no more organized resistance to paying the whiskey tax. But many frontier farmers went on making whiskey that was never taxed. They made it in stills hidden away in the woods, in places that revenue agents could not find. Such illegal moonshine whiskey - so called because it was often made at night-continues to be made to this day.